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Monday, July 20, 2020 | History

2 edition of Investigations into the bacterial chemistry of dental plaques found in the catalog.

Investigations into the bacterial chemistry of dental plaques

Allan StrГҐlfors

Investigations into the bacterial chemistry of dental plaques

by Allan StrГҐlfors

  • 198 Want to read
  • 15 Currently reading

Published by Tryckeri A.-B. Thule in Stockholm .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Dental plaque.,
  • Mouth -- Microbiology.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Allan Strålfors.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination[153]-341 p. :
    Number of Pages341
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL19141519M

    This led to an overall bacterial metabolic vector concept for dental plaque, and helped unravel the bacterial involvement in the degradation of the carbohydrate and nitrogenous substrates that produce the acids and alkali that affect the pH and favor and inhibit dental caries production, respectively.   NON BACTERIAL ORGANISMS IN PLAQUE MYCOPLASMA SPECIES YEAST PROTOZOA VIRUSES NON BACTERIAL 27 28 Dental plaque may be readily visualized on teeth after days of no oral hygiene. FORMATION OF DENTAL PELLICLE INITIAL ADHESION & ATTACHMENT COLONIZATION & PLAQUE MATURATION 29 I.

    Differential Mediumfor Detecting Dental Plaque Bacteria ResemblingActinomyces viscosus andActinomyces naeslundii R. P. ELLEN* AND I. B. BALCERZAK-RACZKOWSKI Faculty ofDentistry, University ofToronto, Toronto, Ontario, CanadaM5G1G6 Received for publication 12 June Amedium for detecting colonies ofActinomyces viscosus and Actinomyces. Muntz, J.A.: Production of Acids from Glucose by Dental Plaque Material, J Biol Chem , Google Scholar Stralfors, A.: Investigation into the Bacterial Chemistry of Dental Plaques, Odont T - ,

      More from Chemistry. Related Stories. Researcher contributes engineering expertise to solving dental maladies. How caries-causing bacteria can survive in dental plaque. Dental plaque is the material that adheres to the teeth and consists of bacterial cells (mainly S. mutans and S. sanguis), salivary polymers and bacterial extracellular products. Plaque is a biofilm on the surfaces of the teeth. This accumulation of microorganisms subject the teeth and gingival tissues to high concentrations of bacterial.


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Investigations into the bacterial chemistry of dental plaques by Allan StrГҐlfors Download PDF EPUB FB2

Buy Investigations into the bacterial chemistry of dental plaques by Strålfors, Allan (ISBN:) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : Allan Strålfors. Ashley FP, Wilson RF. Dental plaque and caries.

A 3-year longitudinal study in children. Br Dent J. Feb 1; (3)– [] [Google ScholarAshley FP, Wilson RF. The relationship between dietary sugar experience and the quantity and biochemical composition of dental plaque in by: STRALFORS A.

Investigations into the bacterial chemistry of dental plaques. Odontol Tidskr. ; 58 ()– Streckfuss JL, Perkins D, Horton IM, Brown LR, Dreizen S, Graves L.

Fluoride resistance and adherence of selected strains of Streptococcus mutans to smooth surfaces after exposure to fluoride. J Dent Res. Feb; 59 (2)–Cited by: Stralfors, Investigations into the bacterial chemistry of dental plaques () Odontologisk Tidskrift Stockholm 4.

J.C. Calandra, L.S. Fosdick, Effect of 2-methyl-l, 4 Author: I.R. Mahler, R.S. Manly. Dental caries is the localized destruction of dental hard tissues by acidic byproducts from dental plaque containing acid-producing bacteria.

Cariology research allows the investigation of caries’ pathogenicity, testing the effects of new caries-prevention methods (i.e., some devices and drugs) and developing new caries-preventing by: 8.

The effects of saliva on the pH and lactate concentration in dental plaques. Caries-rampant individuals. dent. Res. 38, Geddes D. Acids produced by human dental plaque metabolism in situ. Caries Res. 9, Gibbons R. and van Houte J. On the formation of dental plaque. Periodont. 44, This study investigated the bacterial composition of early dental plaque of 74 participants (38 females and 36 males) aged from 20 to 32years having at least 24 teeth.

The number of teeth with caries experience ranged from 0 to 17, and the average was (mean SD). Stralfors, Investigation into the bacterial chemistry of dental plaques Odont. Tskr. () F.J. Orland, Experimental caries in germfree rats inoculated with enterococci others J.A.D.A.

(March )   T JL he purpose of this study was to determine the patterns of distribution of subgingival dental plaque. Investigation of the composition, morphology, and chemical content of plaque has been reported by many authors.1"6 However, the literature contains few references to investigation of the patterns of plaque distribution in the gingival.

plaque by light microscopy of whole or dispersed plaque (50, 95, ), or scanning electron microscopy of plaque deposits (24, 42, 53, 98, 99,) or plaque deposit replicas (61,).

The results of these and other investigations dem- onstrated that dental plaque is composed of a large. Abstract Since the initial observations of oral bacteria within dental plaque by van Leeuwenhoek using his primitive microscopes inan event that is generally recognized as the advent of oral microbiological investigation, oral microbiology has gone through phases of “reductionism” and “holism”.

Arch. oral Biol. Special Supplement, Vol. 4, pp.Pergamon Press Ltd. Printed in Gt. Briti ritain. AN INVESTIGATION INTO THE RELATION BETWEEN THE SIALIC ACID OF SALIVA AND DENTAL CARIES H.

EGGERS LURA Holbak, Denmark Abstract—Saliva from eighteen persons some of whom were caries resistant and some caries active was examined by the Bial-method for the content.

Development of dental plaque begins with the adhesion of salivary bacteria to the acquired pellicle covering the tooth surface. In this study, we collected in vivo dental plaque formed on hydroxyapatite disks for 6 h from 74 young adults and identified initial colonizing taxa based on full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences.

A long-read, single-molecule sequencer, PacBio Sequel, provided. Dental plaque is a structurally- and functionally-organized biofilm. Plaque forms in an ordered way and has a diverse microbial composition that, in health, remains relatively stable over time.

Many Gram-negative bacteria, including bacteria in dental plaque, form and release membrane vesicles (MVs) (Fig. 1) during growth (17 – 20). Using Pseudomonas aeruginosa as a model system, Beveridge et al. (21) demonstrated that Gram-negative bacteria can segregate and package periplasmic components into MVs.

Abstract. Antony van Leeuwenhoek first described oral bacteria. However, not until almost years later was the famous Koch postulate introduced.

Since then, research has extensively been performe. The salivary pellicle is an organic film derived from the saliva and deposited on the tooth surface. It is, however, rapidly colonized by bacteria which make up the dental plaque.

Based on the dental plaque's relationship to the gingival margin, it has been separated for microbiological studies into two different communities: supragingival and subgingival plaque.

regarded dental plaque as microbial plaque, oral/dental biofilms as well as bacterial plaque biofilms [2].

Though the plaque is usually associated with the oral diseases which include cavities and other gum diseases, its construction is normal which cannot be prevented. Dental plaques. Dental plaque is a biofilm or mass of bacteria that grows on surfaces within the is a sticky colorless deposit at first, but when it forms tartar, it is often brown or pale is commonly found between the teeth, on the front of teeth, behind teeth, on chewing surfaces, along the gumline, or below the gumline cervical margins.

Dental plaque is also known as microbial plaque. diseases resulting from dental plaque biof ilm accumulation.

Each of these diseases requires specif ic strate gies for pre vention and treatment. With respect to periodontal disease, dental plaque biof ilm demonstrates a succession of microbial colonization with changes in bacterial flora observ ed from health to disease.

Sugary foods are obvious sources of plaque, but there are others that you might not realize can cause harm. Starches—such as bread, crackers, and cereal—also cause acids to form. The dental plaque created from bacteria also produces substances that irritate the gums, making them red, sensitive, and susceptible to bleeding.The development of a biofilm such as dental plaque can be subdivided arbitrarily into several stages.

As a bacterium approaches a surface a number of specific and non-specific interactions will occur between the substratum and the cell, and these will determine whether successful attachment and .The dental plaques of fifty persons belong to three age groups (1 - 20, 21 - 40, 41 - 60 year and above) were examined to identify microorganisms by the culture method.

Thirty nine bacteria were isolated by spread plate method on BSMY I minimal media. Thirteen out of thirty nine, acidogens colonized in the dental plaques.